Addressing the impact of COVID-19 Considerations for getting back to work, efficiently and effectively

Deloitte/July 2020

In the days and weeks to come, as we learn more, turn corners, and find the “next normal,” it will be critically important to shift focus to planning for how to most efficiently and effectively “ramp back up.” This will require proactive scenario planning that integrates financial models with workforce strategies. There will be no “one-size-fits-all” solution. Each organization will need an approach that meets the needs of their size and scale, aligned with the nature and extent to which they have ramped down.

With more companies starting to allow their employees to work remotely, there’s a good chance that you might be considering whether it’s right for you or your team. In addition, with growing concerns that the Coronovirus may become a pandemic, now is a good time to start preparing for what it might mean to work from home for a few weeks–or longer.

Work From Home Best Practices Video

WAHVE /April 2020

Let’s all reinvigorate our efforts to reach out and creatively build connections with our co-workers, family and communities during this time. And let’s remember the difference it made in a time when we needed it most. 

To help you be as healthy, happy, and productive as possible during this time, we at WAHVE have put together a video featuring our staff members’ and wahves who provide tips on working from home. Now is the time for experienced remote workers to take the lead and help others during this tumultuous time. We’ll get through this stronger, together.

5 Tips for Working From Home for the First Time in 2020

Inc./March 2020

If you spend a lot of time at a desk in an office or in a cubicle, working from home sounds great. You get to set your own schedule, work wherever you want, and you don’t have your boss looking over your shoulder all day.

There’s no question, working remotely has plenty of benefits. To me, working from home means that I’m able to do things I couldn’t if I worked in an office. I’m able to see our four children off to school every morning, and I’m here when they get home. Still, if you’re used to working in an office, the transition can be a bit of a shock.

 

With more companies starting to allow their employees to work remotely, there’s a good chance that you might be considering whether it’s right for you or your team. In addition, with growing concerns that the Coronovirus may become a pandemic, now is a good time to start preparing for what it might mean to work from home for a few weeks–or longer.

Working from home? 4 tips for staying productive

Kim Mok, Gabriel Manga/March 2020

COVID-19 has led many companies to recommend that employees work from home. For many, remote work is a new reality and one that takes some getting used to. Below are a few tips for working remotely from Google’s Primer team to help you make the most out of the situation. A version of this tutorial originally appeared in the free Primer app.

Whether it’s done by choice or by necessity, working from home has its benefits, like avoiding your daily commute. But it also means it’s up to you to motivate yourself and get as much out of your time as you would in an office setting.

To help, here are four tips to keep yourself accountable, collaborative, and productive as you work from home.

Workplace Flexibility and Remote Work Best Practices

Modern technology – secure remote connectivity, the Cloud, collaborative software, VoIP phones, and smart phones – is disrupting the way we work and providing opportunities for remote out-of-office work. Many managers and employees are already working outside the office using their personal devices, but typically on an ad hoc basis without clearly written remote work best practices. Employers may have implemented security measures to protect their systems and data, but they rarely address the larger trend issue of remote work, also referred to as telecommuting. Remote-work best practices is not just about technology and security; it is also about the needs of people and companies. This guide will discuss the various types of remote-work options and best practices for organizations to implement a successful remote work and work-life fit program.

The State of Remote Work 2020

Buffer and AngelList Report – Feb 2020  

When some people think of the workplace of the future, they envision futuristic-style holograms having a meeting or robots cooking lunch for everyone in the office.  

Increasingly, though, the workplace of the future is looking more simple — people having the flexibility to work remotely from home with teammates all around the world.

With that in mind, the question is no longer “is remote work here to stay?” It seems like remote work might even be the new normal.  

The real question now is “what trends are growing across the remote work landscape?”

The Case for Hiring Older Workers

Harvard Business Review   • September – 2019

There’s a lot of talk about gender biasracial bias, and culture bias at work, and each are important for many reasons. But perhaps one of the biggest and most problematic types of bias we face is the bias of age: we often evaluate people based on their age, and this is now becoming a major challenge in the workplace.

Several years ago, through our research for Deloitte, we asked around 10,000 companies, “Is age a competitive advantage or competitive disadvantage in your organization?” The answer probably won’t surprise you. Over two-thirds of the companies considered older age a competitive disadvantage. This is consistent with data from the AARP that shows two-thirds of individuals age 45 to 74 have experienced age-related discrimination.